The Importance of Brand Perception in 2018


“It’s what they say when you’re not in the room…”

Last week there was a story in City AM, reporting on a survey that had been done for MoneySavingExpert. The survey results detailed the ‘UK’s most loved and loathed brands.’

A word of caution before I open the envelope and reveal the results. You suspect that the results of the survey would have been different had it been done for the Telegraph or the Socialist Worker. As I dimly remember from an MBA module, we all have our unconscious biases.

But reading the article was still useful. It made me think about brands – about the way they wax and wane and, inevitably, ask some simple questions. What does a brand do or say? Which brands will disappear? And – inevitably – what’s the brand perception of TAB UK?

So what are the most loved and loathed brands in the UK right now? Let us start off with the good guys. According to the poll, top of the list is Aldi, followed by AmazonJohn LewisM&S and Lidl. The rest of the top ten is made up of IkeaHome BargainseBayWaitrose and Wilko.

(Just breaking off to make a wider business point: the presence of both Aldi and Lidl in the top ten – and the complete absence of the big supermarkets – illustrates what a difficult job Tesco’s new brandJack’s, will have in taking market share from the established discounters.)

Sorry: onto the guys in the black hats. Taking the ten most loathed brands in reverse order, the first five are Debenhams, Asda, Tesco, WH Smith and (the only company to appear in both lists) Amazon. With Debenhams and WH Smith in there, that must sound the alarm bells for town centres all over the UK, irrespective of the Chancellor’s sticking plaster in the Budget.

Next up – still in reverse order – are Primark, House of Fraser, Currys/PC World and Apple. Top of the list – the most disliked brand in the UK – is Sports Direct, owned (like my football team) by Mike Ashley.

But supposing we step back ten years? Think of all the brands and household names that have disappeared. Toys R UsStaples, BHS, Tie Rack. Remember when you couldn’t walk through an underground station without tripping over a branch of Tie Rack?

Fast forward ten years to 2028 and nothing is more certain than that some of the names currently on both lists will have disappeared. M&S are currently competing with Debenhams to see who can issue most ‘store closure’ warnings and John Lewis have seen their profits fall by 99%. Ouch…

Throw in the irresistible rise of the Chinese brands – Huawei (it’s pronounced Hwah-way) is just one example – and the disappearance of some well-known names is inevitable.

So what can we learn?

Is there a common theme among the brands which are in trouble? Or is it just the high street?

I think it goes further than that. For me, one thing is essential in a brand – and that is a clear message.

What does Debenhams do that someone else doesn’t do better? What does M&S do in 2018? What do you go into WH Smith to buy?

Contrast that with a brand dear to the heart of the TAB office in Harrogate: Yorkshire Tea. It’s been around since the 1880s and – over the last few years – has become the second most popular tea brand in the UK. Have the advertising slogans – “Where everything’s done proper” and “Let’s have a proper brew” helped in that?

Yorkshire Tea Brand Perception

Yes. Unquestionably. Ask anyone in the street what the Yorkshire Tea brand represents and they’ll give a simple answer. ‘A proper cup of tea.’ ‘A good, strong cup of tea.’ Nothing more, nothing less.

Any other businesses in Harrogate I can think of? Hmmm…

What does the TAB UK brand represent? The very best peer-to-peer coaching for business owners. Nothing more, nothing less.

When we’re talking about brands the key words in that sentence are ‘business owners.’ Because your brand is more than your business: it’s you. Is the TAB UK brand inextricably linked to the Ed Reid brand? Of course it is: perhaps not as much as TAB York was, but the answer is still ‘yes.’ For me that means doing the right thing every time: building my brand by delivering results for other people.

In Budget week it is tempting to reflect on the ‘brand’ of our elected representatives. But I’d better resist, and instead leave you with my two favourite quotations regarding brands – with the second one  exactly summarising my experience at the hands of Hertz last year:

“It’s what people say about you when you’re not in the room,” and…

“People will forget what you said; people will forget what you did. But people will never forget how you made them feel.”

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One comment

  1. simonjhudson · November 9

    I can’t let this pass without drawing some focus on the number 2. loathed brand…
    Apple, with 1,557 ‘loathe’ votes (they were 4th most loathed in the 2016 survey).

    Yet Apple do have a very clear message and a great ‘Why’ (as the erstwhile Mr Sinek has observed), yet the company is both loved and loathed – not in equal measure. Some brands adopt a very particular position, setting out their store as to who and what they are; and that either works for you or it doesn’t. In fact the reasons so many people dislike Apple is almost certainly the same set of reasons that the ones who do are devout followers. Given that Apple is one of the world’s richest companies, despite being a niche player (and not widely liked), is irrelevant; as a business they have a great business model. I may not approve of it, but I’m sure people with Apple shares are not complaining.

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